Half of the wild orangutan population has been lost since 1950.

There are less than 40,000 orangutans left in the wild

Orangutans spend most of their time in trees.

“Orangutan" comes from the Malay words "orang" (person) and "hutan" (of the forest).

There are less than 40,000 orangutans left in the wild

Orangutans exist only on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra.

Sumatran orangutans are classified as “critically endangered.”

Orangutans are extremely intelligent, and have been observed to make tools.

OC/OVAG Veterinary Workshop coming in June 2014

Experts predict that orangutans could be the first great ape to become extinct.

Orangutans spend most of their time in trees.

Sumatran orangutans are classified as “critically endangered.”

SOCP In Action to Heal Orangutan

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The amazing staff of the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (SOCP) again show why they are on the forefront of orangutan protection.  Here,  one of their veterinary staff works on an adult orangutan who had been shot by a pellet gun. 

To read more about the work of SOCP click on the photo.

The Orangutan Conservancy is pleased to help support the work of SOCP.

posted by: Tom

 

Orangutan News: BOS Releases 12 Orangutans To Natural Habitat

photo courtesy of(ANTARA News/Maryati)

photo courtesy of (ANTARA News/Maryati)

by Novi Abdi for ANTARANEWS.com

The Borneo Orangutan Foundation (BOS) has released 12 orangutans from its rehabilitation center in Nyaru Menteng to their natural habitat in Central Kalimantans Bukit Batikap natural forest.

In the meanwhile, the foundation has also released five orangutans from the rehabilitation center in Samboja Lestari in East Kalimantan to Nyaru Menteng, which is located in the Central Kalimantan province.

“The release (of the orangutans to their natural habitat) this time was done to mark Earth Day, which is commemorated across the world on April 22,” Paulina L. Ela, the BOS foundation spokesperson, stated here on Friday.

She reported that the five orangutans who were re-introduced to their natural environment in Nyaru Menteng are Farudz, an 18-year-old male; Saswoko, a 16-year-old male; Friska, a 17-year-old female; Inou, an 18-year-old male; and Nike, a 17-year-old female.

“They have to be released into the wild in Central Kalimantan because it is where they came from,” asserted veterinarian Agus Irwanto, the manager of the Samboja Lestari program.

This excerpt from a news article appeared in and is courtesy of ANTARANEWS.com and can be read in its entirety here.

posted by: Tom

 

Conservation News: Report Says Indonesian ‘Legal’ Timber Scheme Could Be Greenwashing Illegal Products

Illegal sawmill in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler

Illegal sawmill in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler

by Diana Parker for Mongabay.com

Flaws in the country’s system to verify legal wood products could have implications for trade with Europe, as new research suggests even certified companies in Indonesia may not be meeting EU standards

Indonesian civil society groups have called on their government to reform its legal timber certification system, pointing to widespread illegal practices among certified companies and an auditing system that is “almost impossible” for companies to fail.

The Anti Forest-Mafia Coalition, a group of Indonesian NGOs dedicated to improving forest governance, found evidence that companies certified under the country’s Timber Legality Assurance System (SVLK) had illegally cleared natural forests inside the habitats of protected species, in deep peat areas and even in forests zoned for conservation.

The group also found that several certified companies had been named as suspects for intentionally starting fires in their concessions in violation of Indonesian law.

This excerpt from a news article appeared in and is courtesy of Mongabay.com and can be read in its entirety here.

posted by: Tom

 

Conservation News: ABC Bakers’ Girl Scout Cookies Still Contain Unsustainable Palm Oil

Photo by Carlos Quiles/Rainforest Action Network. Endangered orangutans’ rainforest habitat is being destroyed for palm oil plantations. Yet, instead of changing where the palm oil for their cookies is sourced from, Girl Scouts USA is purchasing misleading “GreenPalm” certificates.

Photo by Carlos Quiles/Rainforest Action Network

by Rhiannon Tomtishen and Madison Vorva for Earth Island Journal

In seventh grade, we were inspired by Jane Goodall’s dedication to chimpanzee conservation and decided to raise awareness about the endangered orangutan in order to earn our Girl Scout Bronze award. When we discovered that the orangutans’ rainforest habitat is destroyed for palm oil plantations, we began educating our peers with a poster board presentation. In the seven years since then, we’ve grown that middle school awareness campaign to an international platform.

We learned that unsustainable palm oil production isn’t just threatening orangutans. Indonesia is the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases due to its rates of deforestation and peat burning, both of which are driven by this industry. Additionally, in 2012, the US Department of Labor linked palm oil production in Indonesia with child labor, and in Malaysia with forced labor. Social injustices linked to palm oil also occur in other countries. During a trip to Colombia with a human rights organization called Witness For Peace, we had the opportunity to speak with communities directly impacted by this industry. Paramilitary groups there had forcibly displaced these people and sold the stolen land to palm oil corporations.

This single ingredient is harming people, animals and the environment, and it’s in 50 percent of the products on American grocery store shelves. Imagine our shock and dismay when we discovered that Girl Scout cookies contain palm oil. As members of the organization since first grade, we had been taught the importance of environmental stewardship and service. Part of the Girl Scout Law includes “to make the world a better place.” Switching to a source of deforestation-free palm oil for its cookies seemed like the right thing for the Girl Scouts to do.

This excerpt from a news article appeared in and is courtesy of Earth Island Journal and can be read in its entirety here.

posted by: Tom