Orangutan News: Shrinking Forests Hamper Orangutan Release

A three-month-old Orangutan baby peeks out from inside a wooden box in East Kutai, East Kalimantan, on Dec. 9, 2011 after being rescued after separated from its mother. (AFP Photo/Firman)

A three-month-old Orangutan baby peeks out from inside a wooden box in East Kutai, East Kalimantan, on Dec. 9, 2011 after being rescued after separated from its mother. (AFP Photo/Firman)

by Tunggadewa Mattangkilang for the Jakarta Globe

Balikpapan. Ten orangutans have been released back into the wild in East Kalimantan after recovery in the Samboja Lestari rehabilitation center.

The six female and four male orangutans were set free in the Kehjesewen conservation forest in the East Kutai district of East Kalimantan on Thursday by the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation (Yayasan BOS).

“In 2014 we began our program by releasing 10 orangutans back into the wild. We are optimistic that we will be able to release more orangutans into their natural habitat — but this has to be supported by the existence of quality, safe forests,” said Samboja Lestari program manager Agus Irwanto.

Agus said the BOS was committed to achieving the release target set up in the Indonesian Orangutan Conservation Action Plan for 2007-2017, announced by President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono during the climate change conference in Bali in 2007. The plan calls for all orangutans in rehabilitation centers to be released back into their natural habitats by 2015.

Agus said that so far the BOS had released 31 orangutans back into natural forests. But more orangutans could be released if deforestation was halted, he said.

This excerpt from a news article appeared in and is courtesy of the Jalarta Globe and can be read in its entirety here.

posted by: Tom

 

Conservation Commentary: Indonesia’s Orangutan Action Plan a Bad Joke

photo by Tim Laman from the Orangutan Conservancy archives

photo by Tim Laman from the Orangutan Conservancy archives

by Erik Meijaard  in the Jakarta Globe

In December 2007, President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono launched Indonesia’s Strategy and Action Plan for National Conservation of Orangutans. Quoting the president from his speech, “this will serve as a blueprint for our efforts to save some of our most exotic but endangered wildlife.” Furthermore, the president said that “the Orangutan action plan formally endorses Indonesia’s commitment to orangutan conservation as expressed in 2005 when Indonesia signed the Kinshasa Declaration on the Protection of Great Apes in the Democratic Republic of Congo.”

And a final quote: “A key understanding that stems from this Action Plan is that to save orangutans, we must save the forests. And by saving, regenerating, and sustainably managing forests, we are also doing our part in reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, while contributing to sustainable economic development of Indonesia. Successful orangutan conservation is the symbol of responsible management of the earth’s resources.”

Excellent stuff. Finally a ray of hope for Indonesia’s endangered species.

We are now over six years into the 10 years action plan, so signs of progress should be easy to find. The action plan commits Indonesia to stabilizing all wild populations by 2017. With habitat loss and hunting being the main threats, this simply means that all remaining wild orangutan populations should either be incorporated in formally protected areas or other compatible land uses, such as sustainably managed timber concessions, and that conservation laws should be enforced.

This excerpt from a commentary piece appeared in and is courtesy of the Jalarta Globe and can be read in its entirely here.

 

 

posted by: Tom

 

Conservation News: Going Up in Smoke: Why You Should Care About Indonesia’s Fires

Photo of Tripa rainforest fire in 2012 courtesy of the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program (SOCP).

Photo of Tripa rainforest fire in 2012 courtesy of the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program (SOCP).

article by David Fogarty at HuffPost Green

Sumatra’s forests are on fire again, less than a year after blazes burned large areas and covered Singapore and parts of Malaysia in thick smoke.

While the fires in Indonesia might seem far away for many people, they are everyone’s problem. Many of the blazes are on deep peat lands, producing huge plumes of smoke and large amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are stoking climate change. This year’s fires are just as intense and threaten a far worse fire emergency because of unusually dry weather that is set to continue for some months. Worse still, there are increasing signs of an El Nino weather pattern for later this year.

El Nino events usually bring drier weather to Indonesia and a spike in forest fires, with the intense 1997-98 El Nino triggering some of the worst fires in living memory in Indonesia.

This excerpt from a news article appeared in and is courtesy of HuffPost Green and can be read in its entirety here.

posted by: Tom

 

Conservation News: World’s Forests Could Trap 20% More Carbon Than Thought

forest photo courtesy of delhidailynews.com

forest photo courtesy of delhidailynews.com

A new study released on Tuesday showed that forests across the world are capable of holding 20 percent more carbon than earlier thought. If the findings are correct then it means that extra 125 billion tonnes of carbon can increase the forest-based carbon credits, which may be offered in carbon markets across the globe.

Forests are the largest hub of carbon as the trees absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which reduce the concentration of carbon in atmosphere and keep global warming under control.

Deforestation leads to the increase of carbon in atmosphere as we cut down trees which adsorb this heat-causing gas.

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh have come up with a new 3D technology which could be used to measure the carbon content of forests. The scientists claimed that the new technology is more detailed and accurate than all other existing methods.

This article appeared in and is courtesy of delhidailynews.com and can be read in its entirety here.

The rainforests of Indonesia are home to orangutans, and the peatland there holds much of the world’s carbon.

posted by: Tom